All is for All celebrate first year of progress with new merchandise

All is for all

All is for All have released their first merchandise online. Images supplied.

All is for All (AIFA) launch their first range of merchandise online today in celebration of an incredible year of progress in the accessibility space since the social change agency launched in March. The new merchandise has been produced in collaboration with local creatives and includes t-shirts and tote bags the profits from which will help support All is for All’s important work.

“We exist to enable people with disabilities to become drivers of development for the modern world,” says co-founder Grace Stratton, a 20-year-old law student with Cerebral Palsy. “The only meaningful way to raise accessibility on the global agenda is to ensure disabled people are leading the conversation. We are creating the environment where this occurs consistently.”

AIFA began as an e-commerce website offering a world first platform for people with access needs to shop online in an empowered and accessible way. Since launching All is For All has also added a modeling agency whose models featured on the runway at New Zealand Fashion Week 2019 and they offer a consultancy service for businesses and organisations. “We are speaking to dozens of businesses – from small start-ups to large corporates – about how they can better understand and serve the disability community,” adds Stratton.

Their latest project is a mix of fashion and raising awareness with AIFA working with local fashion photographers Karen Inderbitzen-Waller and Delphine Avril Planqueel, Adam Bryce and Ch’lita Collins to photograph images of people with disabilities (some who are All is for All models), which are printed on t-shirts and tote bags. Graphic designer Connor Cahill-Fahey also created a graphic for All is for All’s slogan “Fuck the status quo” and illustrator Ruby Jones who rose to fame when her tribute to the Christchurch terror attacks was featured on the cover of Time created a cartoon, both of which feature on the t-shirts and tote bags. Continuing on their accessibility work both the t-shirts and totes feature a high density print, which is slightly raised, and a QR code that leads to an audio description of the design, so that purchasers are given a multi-sensory experience.

“We have had such a huge amount of support for our message, which is essentially that disability is something to be proud of and the disability community is filled with individuals who are dynamic and innovative,” says co-founder Angela Bevan of communications agency SweeneyVesty. “These individuals deserve to be heard and understood and should lead the accessibility conversation. All is for All is ensuring that the community is equipped to blaze a trail that is accessible for future generations, and to buy a t shirt (or tote) is to amplify that message.”

All is for All’s merchandise is available to pre-order online from today and is priced at $55 per t-shirt and $40 per tote bag, with $20 from each sale going towards AIFA’s continuing work. It’s the debut range from the social change agency as there are already plans for a second collection of t-shirts in 2020, with Australian photographer Derek Henderson and UK photographer Peter Hunt confirmed as contributors, and others to be announced in the New Year. Now is the perfect time to wear your support for All is for All’s important work as everyone deserves to be part of the conversation.

All is for all

All is for all

All is for all

All is for all

Images supplied.

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